Adjective Of Agreement

In the case of verbs, gender conformity is less prevalent, although it may still occur. For example, in the past French compound, in certain circumstances, the past part corresponds to the subject or an object (see past compound for details). In Russian and most other Slavic languages, the form of the past in sex corresponds to the subject. If an agreement, contract, decision, etc. is binding, you need to do what it says In Hungarian, verbs have a poly-personal agreement, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its object (battery). There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, him or her specifically). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is a correspondence between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often relates more or less precisely to the person). However, most adjectives are hermaphroditic (like snails). They have two sexes.

They are sometimes masculine and sometimes feminine, depending on the subname used. There are also matches in the number. For example: Vitabu viwili vitatosha (Two books will be enough), Michungwa miwili itatosha (Two orange trees will be enough), Machungwa mawili yatatosha (Two oranges will be enough).